Chair of Organization Theory and Design

Mission of the Chair of Organization Theory and Design

 
  1. We understand business administration and its subfield "Organization Theory and Design” as reality-oriented academic disciplines. The goal is to acquire and to pass on knowledge that helps actors in business and administrative practice to decide in a goal-oriented manner. Based on these overriding guidelines we derive the following, more specific principles.
  2. We strive to develop our research work on the basis of solid theoretical grounds. For us, theories are not unclear, unworldly frameworks. They are overarching, consistent systems of thought, based on human rationality and experience. One important goal of theories is to interconnect divergent academic subfields. Further on, theoretical frameworks have to be relevant for the type of organization studied. They shall allow the derivation of problem-specific explanations, forecasts and recommendations. Theories are a means of acquiring new knowledge - nothing else.
  3. As a result, we prefer a theory-guided approach for our research since we know theories are valid for a longer time than methods, techniques, and factual knowledge.
  4. We assign empirical research a key role in our research since it informs us about organizational and management practices existing in the real world. We strive for a theory-guided form of empirical research to guarantee results in our field of research to be more than accidental, sample-specific phenomena.
  5. We acknowledge the basic equivalence of quantitative and qualitative types of empirical research. None of these two types is generally superior; the choice between them will therefore be considered in each individual case taking into account the research question, the juvenility of the topic, the available knowledge stock, and other conditions given in the area of research.
  6. Although we pursue a distinctive orientation for practical experience, we are aware of the critical distance researchers have to keep towards practice. If we, in our first guideline, have acknowledged the support of a target-aimed action in practice, this cannot mean that we will develop explanations, forecasts, and recommendations preferring one of firms’/administrations’ interest groups. Instead, we want to develop insights supporting firms’ and administrations’ general, long-term oriented capacity to act. We are not afraid of evaluating patterns of action found in reality. However, we want to try to conduct these evaluations from different perspectives and points of interest. We want to identify on which basis (point of interest) each evaluation occurred.
  7. We are not afraid of evaluating patterns of action found in reality. However, we want to try to conduct these evaluations from different perspectives and points of interest. We want to identify on which basis (point of interest) each evaluation occurred. 
  8. The superior goal of our teaching activities is to increase the decision-making capabilities and responsibilities of students. Therefore, we aim to integrate practical methods of instruction and learning (e.g. practical examples, cases, and seminars concerning case studies) in our teaching program. Despite of this focus, for us it is important to implement our basic research principles (theoretical orientation, empirical foundation of conclusions) in the education.
  9. To accomplish this goal of increasing decision-making capabilities and responsibilities, students have to accept the need to self-study and to call in academic literature. It is insufficient to simply learn fragments of ideas documented on powerpoint slides. Especially, the conceptual heterogeneity typical of the field of organizational science requires that students read academic literature.